Iran sold hundreds of tons of ammonium nitrate to Hezbollah, according to intelligence documents

The German daily Die Welt claims it has no data linking the sale of the chemical component to the Beirut explosion
A photo taken on August 11, 2020, shows a view of the destruction at the port of Beirut, where a huge chemical explosion devastated large parts of the capital

PHOTO/AFP  -   A photo taken on August 11, 2020, shows a view of the destruction at the port of Beirut, where a huge chemical explosion devastated large parts of the capital

670 tons of ammonium nitrate. This is the figure that Iranian Quds forces sold to Hezbollah during the years 2013 and 2014, according to intelligence reports and published by the German daily Die Welt.

This sale would be a further transfer between two terrorist organisations with a long history of cooperation. All this when on August 4 an explosion in the port of Beirut, caused by the detonation of 2,750 tons of this substance, killed more than 170 people, injuring more than 6,000 and leaving a city in chaos and devastation.

According to the German newspaper, which quotes Western security officials under anonymity, the Quds Force, an elite unit of Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps dedicated to overseas intelligence activities, sold just over 670 tons of ammonium nitrate in 2013 to the Lebanese terrorist group for nearly 400,000 euros.

The smuggling was carried out by Hezbollah's chief of logistics, Mohammed Qasir, and by the then Quds Force Commander, Qassem Soleimani, who was killed by the United States earlier this year in Iraq, according to the German newspaper.

Three days after the explosion, the leader of the Lebanese militia, Hassan Nasrallah, categorically denied the involvement of his organisation, which had become a political party and which supported him until his resignation a few weeks ago from the Lebanese government. "I deny such and categorically that there is anything of ours in the port, neither arms depot, nor missile depot (...) nor a bomb, nor a bullet, nor an ammonium saltpetre", said Nasrallah.

Die Welt claims to have seen invoices that correspond to the delivery of the ammonium nitrate, but, he continues in his article, they have no evidence that Hezbollah stored the chemical component in the port of Beirut.

It has not yet been determined who was responsible for the explosions, but there are documents showing that both the country's top leaders and security officials were aware of the presence of the chemical component at the port.